Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception Institut Neurosciences Cognition Université Paris Descartes Centre National de Recherche Scientifique
Home
Research
vision Vision
action Action
speech Speech
avoc AVoC
support support staff
People
Former Staff
Teaching
Publications
Ethics
Events
Practical

Calendar
Opportunities
Internships
Contracts
Platforms
Links

Baby Lab

Intranet
Adaptation to frequency-shifted auditory feedback.

Ss attempted to whistle at the frequency of a target note when the sound of their own whistling, played back through headphones, was either electronically shifted in frequency or blotted out by intense masking noise. With auditory feedback masked out, Ss could still hit a note to within .5-2 semitones. When the frequency of their whistling was electronically shifted by +/-300 Hz, Ss adjusted the frequency they produced, shifting it down or up just enough to hold constant the frequency feedback to their ears. When the electronic frequency shift was gradually increased from 0 to +/-300 Hz, Ss adapted to the shift, and when they subsequently tried to hit a target note with auditory feedback masked off, they showed a negative aftereffect of 50-60%. After adapting to a shift of +/-250 Hz, Ss attempted to reset the electronic frequency shift to subjective zero and again showed aftereffects of 45-77%. Proprioceptive and auditory feedback information in controlling whistling is compared with proprioceptive and visual feedback in controlling limb position. (17 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)



PDF Link